Waffenfabrik steyr

Can anyone provide some background information on this rifle? On the left of the breech is a stamped symbol that looks like an inverted scientific female symbol. A circle with a touching cross on top at the o'clock position.

Outwardly it appears as an unaltered military piece. Externally, this rifle has definitely seen better days. Although it really shows its age with stock and metal surface wear. The lands seem in good condition and the crown is not worn or dinged-up. It was a gift and I was told that it was a Swiss mauser. Fixit up? Leave as is and shoot it? Use it for a tomatoe stake? Samchap Waldoboro, ME. Gil Martin. It was a gift and I was told that it was a Swiss Mauser. Remove Advertisements. M, No picture available.

I just thank God that I can get this far. Gil, I'll follow the link. I did read the other day that short rifle versions of the will converted with 2 groove barrels, and the long rifle version was converted using 4 groove barrels. Last edited by Sailormilan2; at PM. It cleaned up good and is a real shooter so I kept it as I bought 4 barreled receivers from Centerfire. I rebuilt the 4 groove to proper specs including the stock.

One 2 groove I rebuilt using a straight bolt, for my "Lefty' son. He finds it much easier to work a staight bolt when reaching up and over. The 4th didn't come with a triggergaurd. The charger clip slot were all modified so that American style 7. Last edited by Sailormilan2; at AM. I have the same model, and my question is I want to built this for my daughter in a Remington will the action hold the pressure from a 6 groove barrel.

I have been out of the game for a while rebuilding my own shop and I have not kept up barrel grooves. I know which twist rates, my preferred barrel makers I would like to go back to if the quality is there.

Steyr Arms

Last edited by mwilkerson; at PM. I don't know if you realize, you just bumped a ten year old thread! I'm no mathematician, just what I've read. As far as a 6 groove barrel, I'm not sure there is a significant jump in pressure?A Chilean Steyr Modelo Mauser rifle.

A gorgeous rifle and an example of old-world quality. Photo: Francis Borek. Currently, we are still in the centenary of the First World War and in the past four years interest in this conflict has risen steadily. This has been helped in part by various forms of media piquing the interest of those who may not have been informed about this incredibly important historical event.

But with a rise in interest, so have we seen a rise in prices. It was once accepted that rifles of the First World War would be less-expensive than those of the Second; they were older, and had been rode harder for a longer period of time. No longer the case, there is still hope for the average shooter. Sort of. The military of the Republic of Chile has always had a bit of a Prussian slant. Even to this day, their parade uniforms include Stahlhelms and elite units still wear Pickelhauben.

Steyr Arms

Naturally their parade rifles are Mauser 98 and 95 rifles and their uniforms are often a spitting image for the German Army. The game-changing Mauser 98 bolt.

Note the large locking lugs and claw extractor. The Mauser was essentially an evolution of the epoch-making Spanish Model Chambered in the 7x57mm cartridge, the rifle and cartridge taught the US Army the importance of clip-loading high velocity cartridges in Cuba.

Boer commandos taught the British some hard earned lessons about marksmanship on the veldt of South Africa with the 7x57mm Model Mauser.

By however, the cock-on-closing Model was starting to appear a little outdated and Chile wanted a new rifle. For them the choice was simple: adopt what the Germans have, which was the famous Model Mauser. Indeed, the rifle that Chile adopted was essentially the same as this the Mauser — though with a few changes. It was dubbed the Modelo Stock disc that is used for unit markings.

Also shown is the quick-detach swivel. It dispensed with the complicated and expensive Lange-Vizier rear sight for a simple tangent sight.

The upper handguard also wrapped around the rear sight. Gone also were the grasping grooves on the stock as well as the stock washer for bolt disassembly.

Very wisely, Chile retained the 7x57mm cartridge. It had already proven itself to a be flat shooting cartridge with low recoil. But perhaps most importantly, Chile already had large stocks of the cartridge and would save money by retaining it.Can anyone provide some background information on this rifle?

On the left of the breech is a stamped symbol that looks like an inverted scientific female symbol. A circle with a touching cross on top at the o'clock position. Outwardly it appears as an unaltered military piece.

Externally, this rifle has definitely seen better days. Although it really shows its age with stock and metal surface wear. The lands seem in good condition and the crown is not worn or dinged-up. It was a gift and I was told that it was a Swiss mauser. Fixit up? Leave as is and shoot it? Use it for a tomatoe stake?

waffenfabrik steyr

Samchap Waldoboro, ME. It was a gift and I was told that it was a Swiss Mauser. M, No picture available. I just thank God that I can get this far. Gil, I'll follow the link. I did read the other day that short rifle versions of the will converted with 2 groove barrels, and the long rifle version was converted using 4 groove barrels.

It cleaned up good and is a real shooter so I kept it as I bought 4 barreled receivers from Centerfire. I rebuilt the 4 groove to proper specs including the stock. One 2 groove I rebuilt using a straight bolt, for my "Lefty' son. He finds it much easier to work a staight bolt when reaching up and over. The 4th didn't come with a triggergaurd. The charger clip slot were all modified so that American style 7. I have the same model, and my question is I want to built this for my daughter in a Remington will the action hold the pressure from a 6 groove barrel.

I have been out of the game for a while rebuilding my own shop and I have not kept up barrel grooves.

I know which twist rates, my preferred barrel makers I would like to go back to if the quality is there. I don't know if you realize, you just bumped a ten year old thread! I'm no mathematician, just what I've read.Their line of bolt-action rifles and semi-automatic pistols has been produced since the s for the German armed forces.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Mauser designs were also exported and licensed to many countries which adopted them as military and civilian sporting firearms. Originally located partly at Ludwigsburg and partly in Christophsthal, the factory was transferred to Oberndorf in the former Augustine Cloister. Andreas Mauser was the master gunsmith there.

His older brother Wilhelm assumed many of his father's duties as he became ill. His brother Wilhelm was four years older. Another brother, Franz Mauser, went to America in with his sister and worked at E.

Peter Paul was conscripted in as an artilleryman at the Ludwigsburg arsenal, where he worked as a gunsmith. By December he had so impressed his superiors that he was placed on inactive military service and assigned to the royal factory at Oberndorf. Paul engaged his older brother Wilhelm in working on a new gun system in their spare time after work.

Paul was the engineer and designer but Wilhelm took on the task of manager for their interests with the Oberndorf factory. Paul's first invention was a cannon and its ammunition. During his entire career he had a unique ability to produce both the gun and the ammunition for it.

Paul and Wilhelm had separated due to differences during this time. After Paul developed a new turning bolt design Wilhelm was impressed enough to rejoin the business and succeeded in obtaining the financing to purchase machinery and continue development. While the original needle gun used a pin that pierced the base of the cartridge to ignite the primer in the middle, Mauser soon developed a needle that ignited the charge at the base, a superior design. Locally the Dreyse needle gun had just been adopted so the brothers turned to the Austrian ambassador to try to sell their gun.

He forwarded their new gun to Vienna for testing. It was here that American Norris of the Remington company saw the new Mauser rifle design. In Norris hired the Mauser brothers to go to Luttich to work on a new design. He also stipulated that patents were to be taken out in his name and that a royalty would be paid to the Mauser brothers for rifles sold.

Norris was convinced that he could sell the design to the French to convert their Chassepot rifles. The Norris-Mauser patent was taken out in the United States. Remington was outraged at the behavior of Norris and never made an effort to sell the new rifle. Based on the Dreyse needle gun, he developed a rifle with a turn-bolt mechanism that cocked the gun as it was manipulated by the user. The rifle initially used a firing needle; a later version used a firing pin and a rear-ignition cartridge.

Norris believed the design could be adapted to convert Chassepot needle guns to fire metallic cartridges. Shortly thereafter, a partnership was formed in Oberndorf between Norris and the Mauser brothers. The results were impressive and Wilhelm was invited to the arsenal at Spandau. Peter Paul and Wilhelm Mauser continued development of their new rifle in Paul's father-in-law's home.

waffenfabrik steyr

The sights were produced at the Xaver Jauch house starting 1 May A delay in the purchase forced them to buy real estate overlooking the Neckar River Valleywhere the upper works was built that same year.

A house in Oberndorf was also rented to fulfill the Bavarian order. By 23 Maythe Mauser partnership had three factories in Oberndorf.Originally part of Steyr-Daimler-Puchit became independent when the conglomerate was broken up in Steyr has been on the " iron road" to the nearby Erzberg mine since the days of the Styrian Otakar dukes and their Babenberg successors in the 12th and 13th century, and has been known as an industrial site for forging weapons.

After the Thirty Years' Warthousands of musketspistolsand carbines were produced annually for the Habsburg Imperial Army. InLeopold Werndl —a blacksmith in Steyr, began manufacturing iron parts for weapons.

After his father's death, year-old Josef Werndl — took over his factory. First applied inthe Mannlicher Mand the Steyr-Hahn M became milestones in auto-loading pistol technology.

After the war, weapons production in Steyr was all but entirely prohibited according to the Treaty of Saint-Germainand the company faced bankruptcy. In the company changed its name to "Steyr-Werke". In the s, Steyr developed an innovative assault rifle, the StG A bullpup design, the StG 77 extensively utilized synthetic materials, and integrated fixed optics. Steyr pistols are marked with a three-digit date code on the slide just forward of the ejection port.

The first letter represents the month of manufacture. The second and third letters represent the last two digits of the year of manufacture.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Steyr Mannlicher. This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Main article: Steyr AUG. Retrieved July 6, Hidden categories: Use mdy dates from September Articles needing additional references from September All articles needing additional references Articles with hAudio microformats All articles with unsourced statements Articles with unsourced statements from September Articles with unsourced statements from May Namespaces Article Talk.

waffenfabrik steyr

Views Read Edit View history.A Chilean Steyr Modelo Mauser rifle. A gorgeous rifle and an example of old-world quality. Photo: Francis Borek. Currently, we are still in the centenary of the First World War and in the past four years interest in this conflict has risen steadily. This has been helped in part by various forms of media piquing the interest of those who may not have been informed about this incredibly important historical event.

But with a rise in interest, so have we seen a rise in prices. It was once accepted that rifles of the First World War would be less-expensive than those of the Second; they were older, and had been rode harder for a longer period of time. No longer the case, there is still hope for the average shooter. Sort of. The military of the Republic of Chile has always had a bit of a Prussian slant. Even to this day, their parade uniforms include Stahlhelms and elite units still wear Pickelhauben. Naturally their parade rifles are Mauser 98 and 95 rifles and their uniforms are often a spitting image for the German Army.

The game-changing Mauser 98 bolt. Note the large locking lugs and claw extractor. The Mauser was essentially an evolution of the epoch-making Spanish Model Chambered in the 7x57mm cartridge, the rifle and cartridge taught the US Army the importance of clip-loading high velocity cartridges in Cuba.

Boer commandos taught the British some hard earned lessons about marksmanship on the veldt of South Africa with the 7x57mm Model Mauser. By however, the cock-on-closing Model was starting to appear a little outdated and Chile wanted a new rifle. For them the choice was simple: adopt what the Germans have, which was the famous Model Mauser. Indeed, the rifle that Chile adopted was essentially the same as this the Mauser — though with a few changes.

It was dubbed the Modelo Stock disc that is used for unit markings. Also shown is the quick-detach swivel. It dispensed with the complicated and expensive Lange-Vizier rear sight for a simple tangent sight. The upper handguard also wrapped around the rear sight. Gone also were the grasping grooves on the stock as well as the stock washer for bolt disassembly. Very wisely, Chile retained the 7x57mm cartridge.

It had already proven itself to a be flat shooting cartridge with low recoil. But perhaps most importantly, Chile already had large stocks of the cartridge and would save money by retaining it. When World War One started, the Austro-Hungarian government purchased the large stocks of Modelo rifles that Steyr had yet to deliver. The rifles were modified slightly by having the rear QD sling mount replaced with a large standard sling swivel to accommodate the M.

The rear sling swivel is really the only way to differentiate between a Chilean and Austro-Hungarian service rifle. The Chilean coat-of-arms and the manufacture date. The service of these WWI rifles is hard to pin down.

Some say these were only issued to rear-echelon soldiers and militia. Others say these rifles were issued to both Austro-Hungarian and German troops who fought together on the Italian Front to ease supply and training issues.View Category. Trades Accepted: Yes, we take trades. Read More. Due to the additional costs of internet sales, shipping, etc. In the case of multiple buyers for one item, customers will be given 24 hours to complete a transaction, after which firearms will be made available to the next buyer.

Returns MUST be left with the transferring dealer. If a customer takes possession of the firearm, Intrepid considers this acceptance of the condition, and will not offer a return. TX residents add 8. Verified Seller. View Sellers Items. Description: On consignment we have a Waffenfabrik Steyr Austrian manufactured Mauser 98 bolt action rifle in.

This rifle features a sporter stock with Monte Carlo cheekpiece, rosewood forend tip and grip cap, and swivel studs, a blued Steyr action that has been drilled and tapped for scope mounts, and 24" sporter barrel, chambered for.

Gun includes a Barska scope in Redfield one-piece mounts. Please contact us with any questions, or for purchase options. We combine shipping on multiple items. All items ship fully insured. Item in photos is item you will receive. Check out more inventory on elkcastle.

Contact us at. Since we have a large retail space, all internet listings are subject to prior sale in store. We do make every effort to remove listings promptly if an item is no longer available.

Conversely, once we receive email notification of a gun purchase online, we make it a priority to pull it from inventory so that it cannot be sold in store.

Condition: Used - See Item Description. Brand: Steyr. Location: TX.


thoughts on “Waffenfabrik steyr”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *